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The integrator is in reality a flux meter, which may be defined as a moving coil galvanometer specially designed for the measurement of magnetic fields, its deflections being determined solely by the total quantity of electricity discharged through the moving coil and being practically independent of the rate at which the discharge takes place.

The special design of the integrator is such that its accuracy for measuring changes in flux linkage in the loop is very high, even when the change takes place very slowly, such as when a vessel crosses at only one or two knots. This means that the size of the signature obtained from a crossing vessel will be approximately the same no matter at what speed the vessel is travelling, since the integrator measures the actual field emanating from the vessel and this does not depend on its speed.

Numerous methods of locating submarines have been developed over the years. As well as time-honoured visual sightings, they include: radar (surface), ASDIC or sonar (underwater, electromagnetic radiation emissions, heat sensing, exhaust analysis, sea lions, pelicans and importantly, in the context of this article, magnetic sensing. One method relying on magnetic properties is the anti-submarine indicator loop. It relies on the production of an induced current in a stationery loop of wire when a magnet (in this case, a submarine) moves overhead. Even if wiped or degaussed, submarines still have sufficient magnetism to produce a small current in a loop. The technology was developed by the British Royal Navy at HMS Osprey (Portland Naval Base) starting back in 1915. It was sent to various Commonwealth countries for deployment. For example, the entire loop materials used in Australia was of British origin (Admiralty Pattern) although Australian-made equipment became available from about 1942 onwards.

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Vintage Admiralty Pattern Integrator

In stock

Product code: 002575
£60.00

The integrator is in reality a flux meter, which may be defined as a moving coil galvanometer specially designed for the measurement of magnetic fields, its deflections being determined solely by the total quantity of electricity discharged through the moving coil and being practically independent of the rate at which the discharge takes place.


The special design of the integrator is such that its accuracy for measuring changes in flux linkage in the loop is very high, even when the change takes place very slowly, such as when a vessel crosses at only one or two knots. This means that the size of the signature obtained from a crossing vessel will be approximately the same no matter at what speed the vessel is travelling, since the integrator measures the actual field emanating from the vessel and this does not depend on its speed.


Numerous methods of locating submarines have been developed over the years. As well as time-honoured visual sightings, they include: radar (surface), ASDIC or sonar (underwater, electromagnetic radiation emissions, heat sensing, exhaust analysis, sea lions, pelicans and importantly, in the context of this article, magnetic sensing. One method relying on magnetic properties is the anti-submarine indicator loop. It relies on the production of an induced current in a stationery loop of wire when a magnet (in this case, a submarine) moves overhead. Even if wiped or degaussed, submarines still have sufficient magnetism to produce a small current in a loop. The technology was developed by the British Royal Navy at HMS Osprey (Portland Naval Base) starting back in 1915. It was sent to various Commonwealth countries for deployment. For example, the entire loop materials used in Australia was of British origin (Admiralty Pattern) although Australian-made equipment became available from about 1942 onwards.


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